Traveling – Nashville

For as many years as I’ve been involved in the world of music, I have never been to Nashville, Tennessee.

So while you are reading this, I am winding up my stay. Comments are disabled as I will be on the road and can’t respond.

My itinerary:

Arrive in Nashville on Friday, August 2nd.

Friday night, a trolley tour scheduled called the “Soul of Music City Night Tour!”

Then Saturday we will tour the Johnny Cash Museum and the old Ryman Auditorium, with a destination of the Grand Ole Opry for a backstage tour at 3:30.

Then back to the Grand Ole Opry at 7 pm for a very special show for all of us Texas music fans.

Gary P. Nunn will be 74 years old in December and his music career has spanned over four decades, but his show at the Grand Ole Opry on Saturday, August 3rd is his debut at the historic venue!

There are over 800 people traveling from Texas to Tennessee to see him perform there. Isn’t that amazing? There will be a fun after-party at the Opryland Hotel and I will be there for sure!

Then on Sunday, I will tour the Country Music Hall of Fame specifically to see their exhibit, “Outlaws and Armadillos,” featuring Texas music artists, and including photos taken by my awesome editor, Ronald McKeown of Buddy Magazine!

Me and Ron McKeown

I will be covering this journey for Buddy Magazine! And, I already have a working title for the piece: “Taking Texas to Tennessee!”

I am so grateful to have the opportunity for this adventure!

Stories From the Road #12

STORIES FROM THE ROAD!A series of first-hand tales from a Texas Musician and songwriter...

This is part of a series of posts I’ve entitled, “Stories From the Road.” Each week I will post a new story from Rick Sikes, a Texas musician who traveled the roads of Texas, Oklahoma, New Mexico and out to California for well over twenty years. With hours to pass in a bus full of sweaty musicians, they found ways to entertain themselves. These stories are told in Rick Sikes’ words. I’ll do my best to correct grammar, but I want to keep them in his own voice.

This week I’m going to switch gears again and talk about another Country Music Legend Rick had the pleasure of working with.

Rick:

“I had the good fortune to work with Red Foley in 1963. He had a great voice and stage presence that propelled him to stardom in the fifties. We got the tour through an agent I had in Waco. When I got the gig, my grandmother, who was a God-fearing woman, said, “I’m so proud you boys are going to work with a good Christian man. Maybe he will help y’all straighten up and do right.” Red had just finished up his last episode of the TV series, “Mr. Smith Goes to Washington,” and flew in from California. I had never met him and didn’t know much about him other than admiring him on the Grand Ole Opry for many years, and of course, his records. I told the boys in the band, “Y’all don’t drink or cuss in front of him. Be on your best behavior. This is a good job, so let’s not blow it.”

That first night, his plane was late and he met us at Mission Stadium in San Antonio. He came rushing into the dressing room with his guitar and ran back out to get his suitcase out of the cab. We introduced ourselves to him and all shook hands. He asked the guitar player to tune him up with us and he showed us the songs which had difficult chords. Then, he opened his suitcase and pulled out a fifth of Vodka, unscrewed the cap and tossed it into the trash can. He took a long swig from the bottle (straight) and offered us a drink. We all declined, of course. He had just gotten his dentures and had to keep sucking them up, making a funny sound. But, when we went on stage, he was great and had the audience spell-bound. He always said a little prayer at the beginning and end of the shows. He’d also say, “My, isn’t this a lovely crowd we have boys?” We’d always say in unison, “Yes, Mr. Foley.” That tour was an eventful and exciting gig.

Pat Boone (Red’s son-in-law), had a big interest in the Hushpuppy Shoe Company at that time. Of course, all of us guys wore cowboy boots, but Red Foley wanted us to wear patent leather Hushpuppies that they were just beginning to market. He gave each of us a pair of bone white, maroon and black patent leather shoes, which he insisted we wear. So, that’s what we wore on stage. None of us had seen patent leather shoes before and they were really shiny. You could take a little bit of vaseline on a cloth and shine them up where they were glassy. People asked us many times how we got our shoes to shine so good. I’d tell them, “Well, when you work with Mr. Foley, you have to keep your shoes shined like this because he insists.”

So anyway, one night, one of the guys let the fire fall off his cigarette onto the top of one of his shoes. They were basically plastic and the fire sat on top until it burned through the shoe onto his toe. He did quite a little dance for us on the bandstand. Needless to say, he didn’t care much for the plastic shoes after that.

But, I got to meet a lot of the Grand Ole Opry stars on the tour with Red Foley. One show we did in Lufkin, Texas had Sonny James, Uncle Cyp Brasfield, Frankie Miller, Marsha Lynn and ourselves. The newspaper article advertising the show misspelled my name, putting Sykes instead of Sikes. But things like that happened often. I remember one time I had a show at Fort Sill Air Base in Lawton, Oklahoma and when we pulled up at the venue, the marquee said, “Appearing tonight, Red Skies.” So, having my name misspelled wasn’t unusual.”

Red_Foley1

Red_Foley2

Uncle_Cyp_Brasfield_Rick_Sikes
Uncle Cyp Brasfield and Rick Sikes

 

I hope you've enjoyed this segment of-STORIES FROM THE ROAD-from Texas SingerSongwriterRICK SIKES

Stories From the Road #9

STORIES FROM THE ROAD!A series of first-hand tales from a Texas Musician and songwriter...

This is part of a series of posts I’ve entitled, “Stories From the Road.” Each week I will post a new story from Rick Sikes, a Texas musician who traveled the roads of Texas, Oklahoma, New Mexico and out to California for well over twenty years. With hours to pass in a van full of sweaty musicians, they found ways to entertain themselves. These stories are told in Rick Sikes’ words. I’ll do my best to correct grammar, but I want to keep them in his own voice.

Rick:

“I had the pleasure and honor of doing a few gigs with Little Jimmy Dickens. What a ball of energy he was and could charm the heck out of a crowd.  Once in Houston, we were playing a place out on Airline Road,  called “Dancetown USA.” It was a big place, one of the hottest joints on the circuit back then, and I played there often. Little Jimmy had a terrible cold that night, so we went on out to set up while he stayed at the motel because he was feeling really bad. I was on the stage hooking up equipment and this dear lady stumbled up to the stage (she was in her cups) and said, “Are you Little Jimmy Dickens?” I said, “No, Ma’am, I work for him.” She said, “He gave me something over twenty years ago and I’ve never forgot him. Will you tell me when he gets here?” I said, “Yes, Ma’am, I sure will.” When Jimmy came in and I stood beside him, his cowboy hat came just under my armpit. I said, “Jimmy, there is a lady here who thought I was you. She may be just a little bit drunk.” The little rascal looked up at me and said, “Son, if she thought you were me, she’s a hell of a lot more than a bit drunk.” Jimmy was a great showman and one of the few old-time acts working into his eighties. He was truly one of the greats in traditional country and it was a pleasure to work with him. ”

 

Rick and Little Jimmie Dickens
Little Jimmy Dickens and Rick Sikes

**Little Jimmy Dickens, was an American country music singer and songwriter famous for his humorous novelty songs, his small size (4’11” [150 cm]), and his rhinestone-studded outfits (which he is given credit for introducing into country music live performances). He started as a member of the Grand Ole Opry in 1948 and was inducted into the Country Music Hall of Fame in 1983. Before his death, he was the oldest living member of the Grand Ole Opry.**

 

Rick_Sikes_Dancetown_USA
Rick Sikes and the Rhythm Rebels along with Dean Beard at Dancetown USA

 

I hope you've enjoyed this segment of-STORIES FROM THE ROAD-from Texas SingerSongwriterRICK SIKES