Stories From the Road – #13

STORIES FROM THE ROAD!A series of first-hand tales from a Texas Musician and songwriter...

This is part of a series of posts I’ve entitled, “Stories From the Road.” Each week I will post a new story from Rick Sikes, a Texas musician who traveled the roads of Texas, Oklahoma, New Mexico and out to California for well over twenty years. With hours to pass in a bus full of sweaty musicians, they found ways to entertain themselves. These stories are told in Rick Sikes’ words. I’ll do my best to correct grammar, but I want to keep them in his own voice.

RICK:

“Back in the sixties, it wasn’t good enough just to be able to play great music. You had to look like a band and you had to have a little something different or extra that the next guy didn’t. So, we came up with different skits that we’d perform along with certain songs.  My brother, Bobby was always game for acting a fool.

We created this one skit for “Please Mister Custer.” I helped Bobby make a Yankee Calvary uniform he’d slip into that had a wooden block with three holes in it, in the seat of the britches. He wore horn-rimmed glasses and would be saying, “Please Mister Custer, I just don’t want to go. Those people are savages,” and so on until the end of the song. Then, while he was singing, I’d be slipping arrow shafts into the wood block so it looked like he was shot in the rear. At the end, he’d do a stumbling, falling act (Bobby was double-jointed and very agile.) He would fall off the stage and do a dying ritual out on the dance floor.  At the end, he’d lay completely still on the floor with these arrows sticking out of his butt. Then the band would play “Taps” while I pulled the arrows out.

One night we were doing this act and he fell off the stage, wiggling and squirming around like an inchworm with his butt in the air. I  go down, like normal, and start to pull the arrows out while the band plays “Taps.” This lady ran up from out of nowhere, knocked the hell out of me and said, “Get away from him, you son-of-a-bitch. You done hurt him enough already.”

That was one of the skits. We had another little gig we did that was a version of “Hello Walls #2,” that Ben Colder recorded (the old drunk). Bobby would act like he was throwing up. He’d take his hat off and pretend he was throwing up in his hat. One night he was doing that act and he deliberately fell off the edge of the stage and stumbled around on the dance floor until he fell down.

Some drunk lady came running up to him with a wet bar towel trying to wipe his face. She said, “Here, honey. Maybe this will help. I know just how you feel. I’ve been there myself.”

Bobby said, “Dammit lady, get away. Get away. You’re ruining my act.”

She didn’t give up. She said, “I’m gonna help you feel better. I know how it is. I’ve been drunk too.”

We never meant any harm doing these skits. We just wanted to entertain and do more than stand up there and plunk on guitars. It helped earn us a reputation and kept people coming back just to see what we were going to do next.

That was before laser shows and all the fancy electronics they have nowadays. We had to invent our own.”

I searched through tons of pictures looking for one of the “Please Mister Custer” act, and couldn’t find one. But, did find one of Bobby doing “Hello Walls #2.”

Bobby_Drunk_Act
Bobby Sikes doing “Hello Walls #2”

And I found another one of their popular skits where they dressed like Hippies and played rock ‘n roll.

Hippie_Rhythm_Rebels

I hope you've enjoyed this segment of-STORIES FROM THE ROAD-from Texas SingerSongwriterRICK SIKES

 

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I ran across this – Reflection

I ran across this nugget today.

Rick_Jan_Saloon

And it prompted these thoughts…

For everything that we did wrong…

For everything that we got right…

For all that we should have done…

For all that we did do…

For all the struggles…

For all the victories…

Through it all – We loved.

We dared to love with all our hearts

All our souls…

AND, we managed to have some fun along the way.

Funny how the holiday season brings nostalgia.

snow_rose_by_micsmitty-d4rirkl

Stories From the Road #12

STORIES FROM THE ROAD!A series of first-hand tales from a Texas Musician and songwriter...

This is part of a series of posts I’ve entitled, “Stories From the Road.” Each week I will post a new story from Rick Sikes, a Texas musician who traveled the roads of Texas, Oklahoma, New Mexico and out to California for well over twenty years. With hours to pass in a bus full of sweaty musicians, they found ways to entertain themselves. These stories are told in Rick Sikes’ words. I’ll do my best to correct grammar, but I want to keep them in his own voice.

RICK:

“One time we had bookings out in California. We left Brownwood, Texas and made the mistake of stopping in Juarez, Mexico. We had too much fun…drank too much and hung out with too many senoritas. We didn’t really have a whole lot of money left by the time we got out of Juarez, but we had to get on to California to work. Then, the worst happened when we got into Arizona somewhere. The bus started making an engine noise. We had to stop and get it fixed. To the best of my memory, it was an oil pump. At any rate, we were sincerely broke by the time we reached California. We found a motel that rented apartment type rooms; like two bedroom motel rooms. I told the lady who managed it, “We’re musicians and we get paid next week. We get paid every week. We just blew into town from Texas and had some bus trouble so we don’t really have the money to pay you in advance, but we would like to rent the place. We’re going to be here at least six weeks.” I have no idea what possessed her to agree, but she said, “Ok. I’m going to trust you for this week.”

We settled in and had just enough money to buy a pound of bologna and a loaf of bread. We’d managed to get out of Mexico with a few cartons of Mexican cigarettes and a few bottles of Cognac. So, we drank Cognac, smoked Mexican cigarettes and ate bologna and bread for a week.

Finally, at the end of that week, we got paid. That night we went to a place down the street from the motel that advertised all the chicken you could eat for a buck. We almost wiped the poor guy out. I mean, we were hungry! I told him fair and square, “This is the first time we’ve really eaten in a week. We’ve been living off bologna and bread. I’m sorry we wiped you out.” He laughed and said, “No, no. You guys eat all you want and come back again. That is all I ask; that you come back and see me. I’ll come out in the long run.” So, we ate fried chicken there often, but we didn’t eat hardly as much as that first time.

The irony of this band business…this music business, is that I would be up on stage with a fifteen-hundred dollar suit on, high dollar boots, Stetson hat and all kind of fancy hand-made belts and guitar straps. I would be up there looking like I had a million dollars when I didn’t have fifty cents to my name. People would say to me, “Man, I wish we were like y’all are. You get up there and work only four hours a night and make a lot of money, get all the women and have all the fun. And, I would be thinking, “Man they have no idea what this is all about. No idea.” They didn’t know how many hundreds of hours of rehearsal we put in and all the money that had to be paid out. It was not as it appeared. ”

Rick and Band 1960's6 (2017_11_16 21_30_48 UTC)Rick 1960's3

I hope you've enjoyed this segment of-STORIES FROM THE ROAD-from Texas SingerSongwriterRICK SIKES

TIL DEATH DO US PART – A REVIEW BY @dlfinnauthor

When someone reads and leaves a review for one of my books, I am always moved. But, this review from D.L. Finn made my eyes misty.

Here is her review on Amazon:

“This is the final book in the fictionalized true-story of Luke and Darlina Stone. The story continues where it left off in “Home at Last” for Luke and Darlina. The remarkable journey of this couple comes full circle when music reenters their lives. I loved that Darlina (and their daughter) joined Luke on stage. It was beautiful to read the process of this couple creating music together. I felt every emotion reading “’Til Death Do Us Part”, especially knowing it’s the real story of the author– and it was the last book. I was heartbroken watching the decline of Luke’s health, but was amazed, again, at how strong their love was. When I hear an owl hoot at night it will always remind me of this couple’s unwavering love. A beautifully written series I highly recommend.”

Thank you to D.L. for the kind words! Please visit the original post on her BLOG.

Christmas is coming! If you’d like an autographed copy of TIL DEATH DO US PART, visit my website.

And, of course, this book can be purchased on Amazon

You can find out more about all of my books on my website

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Stories From the Road #9

STORIES FROM THE ROAD!A series of first-hand tales from a Texas Musician and songwriter...

This is part of a series of posts I’ve entitled, “Stories From the Road.” Each week I will post a new story from Rick Sikes, a Texas musician who traveled the roads of Texas, Oklahoma, New Mexico and out to California for well over twenty years. With hours to pass in a van full of sweaty musicians, they found ways to entertain themselves. These stories are told in Rick Sikes’ words. I’ll do my best to correct grammar, but I want to keep them in his own voice.

Rick:

“I had the pleasure and honor of doing a few gigs with Little Jimmy Dickens. What a ball of energy he was and could charm the heck out of a crowd.  Once in Houston, we were playing a place out on Airline Road,  called “Dancetown USA.” It was a big place, one of the hottest joints on the circuit back then, and I played there often. Little Jimmy had a terrible cold that night, so we went on out to set up while he stayed at the motel because he was feeling really bad. I was on the stage hooking up equipment and this dear lady stumbled up to the stage (she was in her cups) and said, “Are you Little Jimmy Dickens?” I said, “No, Ma’am, I work for him.” She said, “He gave me something over twenty years ago and I’ve never forgot him. Will you tell me when he gets here?” I said, “Yes, Ma’am, I sure will.” When Jimmy came in and I stood beside him, his cowboy hat came just under my armpit. I said, “Jimmy, there is a lady here who thought I was you. She may be just a little bit drunk.” The little rascal looked up at me and said, “Son, if she thought you were me, she’s a hell of a lot more than a bit drunk.” Jimmy was a great showman and one of the few old-time acts working into his eighties. He was truly one of the greats in traditional country and it was a pleasure to work with him. ”

 

Rick and Little Jimmie Dickens
Little Jimmy Dickens and Rick Sikes

**Little Jimmy Dickens, was an American country music singer and songwriter famous for his humorous novelty songs, his small size (4’11” [150 cm]), and his rhinestone-studded outfits (which he is given credit for introducing into country music live performances). He started as a member of the Grand Ole Opry in 1948 and was inducted into the Country Music Hall of Fame in 1983. Before his death, he was the oldest living member of the Grand Ole Opry.**

 

Rick_Sikes_Dancetown_USA
Rick Sikes and the Rhythm Rebels along with Dean Beard at Dancetown USA

 

I hope you've enjoyed this segment of-STORIES FROM THE ROAD-from Texas SingerSongwriterRICK SIKES

 

 

 

Stories From the Road #8

STORIES FROM THE ROAD!A series of first-hand tales from a Texas Musician and songwriter...

This is part of a series of posts I’ve entitled, “Stories From the Road.” Each week I will post a new story from Rick Sikes, a Texas musician who traveled the roads of Texas, Oklahoma, New Mexico and out to California for well over twenty years. With hours to pass in a van full of sweaty musicians, they found ways to entertain themselves. These stories are told in Rick Sikes’ words. I’ll do my best to correct grammar, but I want to keep them in his own voice.

Rick:

“There was a singer back in the sixties named Warren Smith. He was very good and charted some records. In fact, “I Don’t Believe I’ll Fall In Love Today,” got to #5 on the charts in 1960. He also did some recording for Sun records. I thought he was an excellent talent. We did a lot of backup gigs at that time and we backed him up at Round Rock, Texas at the Big G Club. Then, later on that night, we found out that after he finished the gig, he had gone into Austin and robbed a drug store for some drugs. That was the last I heard of Warren Smith.”

Warren Smith
This photo was taken from Rick’s collection

Kenny Price was a musical genius. He could play almost any instrument exceptionally well and could sing at least three parts of harmony. I booked Kenny on his first gig in Texas through Jimmie Key at New Keys Talent. I booked Kenny in at Pat’s Hall in Fredericksburg, Texas. He met me in Brownwood and I drove him down to Fredericksburg. We stopped at a restaurant in Brady, Texas to eat some lunch. Well, Kenny damn near cleaned ’em out. That guy could put away some chow. We got to Pat’s Hall and they had a Lone Star sponsored band out of San Antonio to back Kenny. There were seven guys in the band. Kenny asked one of them if they would tune his guitar with them and the guy said, “What’s the matter? Can’t you tune a guitar?” Kenny said, “Damned right I can tune a guitar, you sonofabitch, and if you guys get smart-assed with me, Rick and I will take your instruments away from you and play the gig ourselves. I can play every damned instrument you’ve got on that stage and probably a damned sight better than y’all can.” The whole band looked kinda’ stunned.

We went to a table and drank a little whiskey while the band warmed up. This curvy blonde came up to the table and gushed over Kenny. She was obviously star struck. She went on and on. I remember her saying,  “I can’t believe it. I just saw you on TV last night and here you are in Fredericksburg.” Kenny grinned and said, “Ain’t it a miracle, darlin’. Here, sit down.” He patted a chair beside him and she sat. “What’s your name, darlin’?”

I can’t recall what her name was, but she sat down and Kenny laid it on strong. After a couple of drinks, he told her, “Honey, I’ve got to go up and play, but I sure would like it if you’d come to the motel tonight with ol’ Uncle Kenny.” She giggled and batted her eyelashes and said, “Oh, I don’t think my husband would like that too much.” He pulled her up real close and said, “Oh hell, just tell him you’re going with me. He won’t mind.” She giggled some more and then said she had to go.

I told Kenny, “Man, these people down here are pretty clannish and they’re probably all kin in some way or another. If you fight one, you’ll have to fight them all.” He replied, “Hell, I’m from Kentucky and everyone is clannish there. I ain’t afraid of these bastards, are you?” “No,” I said, “but I don’t see any use in getting into it with ’em.” He slung back another whiskey and said, “Well, are you afraid to get an ass whipping?”

I leaned back in my chair hoping we would both get out of there without a fight. “No, I’ve had it before.” Then we both just started laughing. The old gal never came back over.

Kenny could tell a joke like nobody else. He could imitate the male and female voices and he was funny. I booked him several other gigs in Texas over the years, but I’ll never forget that first time.”

**Six-foot tall, 300-pound Kenny “The Round Mound of Sound” Price was best remembered for his work on the long-running television show Hee Haw; he was also a talented singer/songwriter and musician who never quite made it to the big-time, despite having 34 chart singles over his 15-year career.**

 

Kenny_Price
Kenny Price

 

I hope you've enjoyed this segment of-STORIES FROM THE ROAD-from Texas SingerSongwriterRICK SIKES

 

Stories From The Road #7

STORIES FROM THE ROAD!A series of first-hand tales from a Texas Musician and songwriter...

This is part of a series of posts I’ve entitled, “Stories From the Road.” Each week I will post a new story from Rick Sikes, a Texas musician who traveled the roads of Texas, Oklahoma, New Mexico and out to California for well over twenty years. With hours to pass in a van full of sweaty musicians, they found ways to entertain themselves. These stories are told in Rick Sikes’ words. I’ll do my best to correct grammar, but I want to keep them in his own voice.

Rick:

“Sometime, long about 1964, I had gotten hoooked up with booking agents in the bigger cities. One of them was out of Waco, Texas.

Willie Nelson and his ex-wife, Shirley Collie, had come from California around this same time. Willie was pretty much unknown then. He was known more as a writer and not a lot as a performer. He had one record going for him called “Touch Me” and he didn’t have a band at the time. So, my agent from Waco asked me and my band to back Willie and Shirley on a little tour through Texas, and we did. These were mostly stage shows.

We did a stadium show in Austin or San Antonio and the acoustics were hellish. You’d speak a word and just as you finished, it would echo back – or as we used to say back then, slap you in the face. Instruments (especially drums) were really a pain.

Another incident I remember took place in Brady, Texas. We were scheduled to do a stage show at the high school auditorium from 7 ’til 8:30, and then we were to play at the Brady Country Club from 9 or 9:30 until midnight. We set up at the high school auditorium and a little after 7, there were only five or six people who had shown up. So, the promoter decided we should go ahead and tear it down and go out to the country club to set up for that dance.

We did, and it was getting on towards 9 o’clock but still, there was not hardly anyone showing up there either. I had a van with a P.A. system and horn on top, so the promoter asked me to head into town and advertise that there was a dance with Willie Nelson at the country club and invite people out on the P.A.

We were cruising the streets and I was plugging the dance hard. A policeman pulled us over and asked to see our permit to use the P.A. I told him we didn’t have one and he said, “Even if you did, it wouldn’t allow you to use that P.A. this late in the day.”

I felt it was time for an alibi so I told him, “The mayor is out at the Country Club and he told us to come in and plug the dance.” The cop said, “Well, I think that’s enough for tonight, so turn it off.” I said, “Yes, sir. Thank you, sir.” We hauled it back to the Country Club and started playing.

Willie and Shirley put on a great show and I think we may have had around 25 for 30 people show up. We didn’t get paid that night and I doubt if Willie and Shirley did. Willie wore suits and neckties back then and had a businessman’s haircut and was clean-shaven.

We didn’t know it at the time, but in a few short years, Willie would be well-known everywhere. It was truly an honor and privilege to back him and a friendship formed that lasted over the years.”

Willie_Nelson_Shirley_Collie_Rhythm_Rebels
Willie Nelson and Shirley Collie with the Rhythm Rebels (Rick took the picture)
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Willie Nelson and Shirley Collie 1960s
youngwillielg
Pen and Ink Drawing of young Willie by Rick Sikes

 

Willie and Rick
Willie and Rick reunited in 2003 (Rick was already in a wheelchair)

**A side note** When Rick saw Willie again in 2003, he asked him if he remembered the Brady shows and Willie did. Then he asked him if he ever got paid for them and Willie said he didn’t. They had a good laugh over it.

I hope you've enjoyed this segment of-STORIES FROM THE ROAD-from Texas SingerSongwriterRICK SIKES

 

Stories From the Road #6

STORIES FROM THE ROAD!A series of first-hand tales from a Texas Musician and songwriter...

This is part of a new series of posts I’ve entitled, “Stories From the Road.” Each week I will post a new story from Rick Sikes, a Texas musician who traveled the roads of Texas, Oklahoma, New Mexico and out to California for well over twenty years. With hours to pass in a van full of sweaty musicians, they found ways to entertain themselves. These stories are told in Rick Sikes’ words. I’ll do my best to correct grammar, but I want to keep them in his own voice.

Rick:

“I started in first grade with a kid named Dean Beard. Our birthdays were only days apart and we went all through school together. We formed our first band together in the late 40s or early 50s, a rockabilly band called “The Crew Cats.”

Dean was a great vocalist as well as a musician and loved to act up on stage. He earned the name of “The West Texas Wildman” because of his frantic stage presence and piano playing style.

Anyway, we were playing a gig out at Buffalo Gap one Saturday afternoon. This was where I got my first glimpse at how girls reacted to musicians. We played pretty straight rockabilly at that time and these teenage girls threw their underwear up on stage. I thought that was pretty neat. I was a big ol’ dumb kid and never saw anything like that before.

Dean Beard introduced me to Elvis Presley. I was working at the brickyard in Coleman and got in one Friday evening to find Dean waiting for me at my mom’s house with Elvis. Dean had picked him up at the bus station earlier in the day. I remember my mom offering Dean fifty cents to take Elvis across the street to a barber shop to get a haircut. She didn’t think he ought to go on stage looking like that with the big sideburns and long hair. Elvis played on my mom’s piano while I took a shower and got ready to go to Abilene to do a show. At that time, we were more popular than Elvis and it was no big deal to ride around with him in the car. No one knew who he was yet. Hell, we didn’t even take any pictures. That night, after the show, Elvis got sloppy drunk and Dean and I couldn’t wait to get him back on the bus to Memphis. A few days later, I heard my mom say that she didn’t see how that boy was ever going to make it in music.

Dean Beard and I split off and formed separate bands after high school. He kept the name Dean Beard and the Crew Cats and I named my band The King Cats. He stayed with the rockabilly sound and I went more traditional country. In 1958 Dean went to California along with Jimmy Seals and Dash Crofts (who were part of his band) to work in the group called The Champs, who had produced the huge hit, “Tequila.” Later on that year, Dean was in a bad car wreck so he quit The Champs and came back home. We always came back around to doing shows together and worked with Slim Willet on the Big State Jamboree, but by 1970, Dean had pretty much given up on the music and suffered a lot of health problems. He died in April of 1989, only four years after I got out of prison.”

Both Rick Sikes and Dean Beard are listed as pioneers in the West Texas Music Hall of Fame

Listen to Dean Beard on YouTube

Rick Sikes The Cat
Rick Sikes and the King Cats

 

 

Rick, Dean and Band
Rick Sikes shaking Dean Beard’s hand

 

Rick and Band with Dean
Dean Beard to the left of Rick

I hope you've enjoyed this segment of-STORIES FROM THE ROAD-from Texas SingerSongwriterRICK SIKES

 

 

Stories From The Road #5

STORIES FROM THE ROAD!A series of first-hand tales from a Texas Musician and songwriter...

This is part of a new series of posts I’ve entitled, “Stories From the Road.” Each week I will post a new story from Rick Sikes, a Texas musician who traveled the roads of Texas, Oklahoma, New Mexico and out to California for well over twenty years. With hours to pass in a van full of sweaty musicians, they found ways to entertain themselves. These stories are told in Rick Sikes’ words. I’ll do my best to correct grammar, but I want to keep them in his own voice.

“I started out playing rodeos with George Sadler and the Saddle Pals. We’d go out all day on Saturdays to various little towns around the area and advertise the rodeo. They’d  have an old flatbed trailer set up as a stage on the courthouse square or somewhere downtown. We would play for fifteen or twenty minutes and plug the rodeo that night, then load up and go to the next town. George was a fiddler and loved to play hoedowns. I played rhythm guitar for him and sang.  Then, we’d play the rodeo dance that night. It was a good experience for me.

At one point during my time with The Saddle Pals, a guy came along named Gene Dunn. He was a tall slender fellow and a damned good lead guitar player. He worked in the oilfield (pipeline). His son is Ronnie Dunn of the famed Brooks & Dunn. Ronnie was born in Coleman during the time Gene worked with us.

We cut a record or two on King Records that never got pressed. George Sadler was quite a songwriter. In fact, to the best of my knowledge, he actually wrote, “Don’t Let The Stars Get In Your Eyes,” that Slim Willett and many others had huge hits with. I say this because I heard and played that song many times before Slim ever cut it. Slim came to me and asked me to teach his guitar player the riff when they were learning it, and that’s a true story. I don’t know the deal, whether George sold it to Slim or if he just cut it and claimed to be the writer. Lots of stuff like that went on back then. No one hardly ever copyrighted their songs. It was a different time. But, that song went on to be huge and I don’t know if George ever got a dime from it. He lived very poorly.

I’ll tell one more story about George Sadler. They lived in an old run down house out in Novice. They must have had ten kids. And, they had chickens. But, they let the chickens run in and out of the house, so needless to say, it wasn’t the cleanest place I’ve been. When I’d go out to talk to George, I’d have to shoo the chickens off the couch and try not to sit in chicken shit. But, this was just the way they lived. There’d be a baby crawling around on the floor and kids in stair-step ages running around. But, he was a great songwriter and fiddle player and I learned a lot from him. I just never stayed for dinner.”

slim-willet-with-the-brush-cutters-dont-let-the-stars-get-in-your-eyes-4-star-78

**I scoured through hundreds of photos looking for one of George Sadler, but found nothing and uncovered nothing on the internet. Another thing that was not commonplace back then was cameras.**

I hope you've enjoyed this segment of-STORIES FROM THE ROAD-from Texas SingerSongwriterRICK SIKES

Stories From The Road #4

STORIES FROM THE ROAD!A series of first-hand tales from a Texas Musician and songwriter...

This is part of a new series of posts I’ve entitled, “Stories From the Road.” Each week I will post a new story from Rick Sikes, a Texas musician who traveled the roads of Texas, Oklahoma, New Mexico and out to California for well over twenty years. With hours to pass in a van full of sweaty musicians, they found ways to entertain themselves. These stories are told in Rick Sikes’ words. I’ll do my best to correct grammar, but I want to keep them in his own voice.

This segment involves the dedication of Hords Creek Lake, located 8 miles west of Coleman.

“We still lived out in the country when they dedicated Hord’s Creek Lake. The Corp of Engineers had Lefty Frizzell, Harry Choates, and the Chuck Wagon Gang out to provide entertainment for the day. At that time, Lefty was about the hottest thing happening. I was a big ol’ dumb country kid out there in the sticks thumping on a guitar. I thought Lefty was great. They had an old touring car – stretch car – not exactly a limousine, but what they used back then, to tour.

My, mom and dad, took me and my younger brother out to spend the day. Most everybody in Coleman County turned out for this thing. I went and sat in the backseat of the car with Lefty Frizzell and talked to him. I can only imagine now, what he must have thought about some hick country kid talking to him. I told him all about my aspirations of becoming a singer. I was starstruck and thrilled to talk to him. He told me he was going to California when he left. He had some gigs out there. He said, “Do you want to go to California with me?” I said, “Well sure, man. Are you joking?” He said, “No I’m not joking. Do you want to go to California with me? I’ll take you with me.” I told him I would be back in a little bit. I ran to find my mom and dad and told them what Lefty said and that I needed to go home and get some clothes.

My dad said, “Are you crazy, boy? You’re not going anywhere with that drunk son-of-a-bitch.” Lefty was very drunk that day. I told my dad, “This is my big chance.” And Dad said, “You’re not going anywhere with him. You gotta be out of your mind if you think we’re gonna let you go off with him to California or anywhere else.” And that was that.

I was pretty mad at Dad for a while. Of course, I thought I’d just blown my one big chance to “make it big.” Looking back, I know Lefty was just drunk-talking. But, it was another event that made a big impression on me at a young age.”

lefty-frizzell-2d84b4ed-f3bc-4adb-8c49-2d36bd91adda

And while this is not the exact car Lefty was touring in that day, it is a historically accurate example of what they used.

Cadillac_75_Imperial_Touring_Limousine_1938_2

What do you think would have happened if Rick had gone with Lefty that day? I’m curious to hear your thoughts.

I hope you've enjoyed this segment of-STORIES FROM THE ROAD-from Texas SingerSongwriterRICK SIKES